Category Archives: Germany

The Lutheran Church in Borntuchen, Pomerania

borntuchen_church

This is apparently the Lutheran church in Germany were many of my ancestors worshiped. Many were confirmed in the faith here. I think the church was destroyed during the Second World War or shortly thereafter by the Soviets, the Red Army.

ajh

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Fascinating stuff! Long-lost siblings of my great grandpa — in Germany.

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Great grandpa Albert had a sister I didn’t know about. Her name was Friederike Caroline Auguste Fromke. In English this translates as Fredericka. She was born on February 4, 1859. She married a man named Friedrich Johann Ferdinand Kowalke on April 11, 1882 in a place called Borntuchen in Germany. I haven’t been able to track down what happened to them.

ajh

Einwohner? Notes on German society in 1883, using my great grandpa as a case study.

GERMAN, A CHANGING LANGUAGE

Hmm. The only record that I’ve found of my great grandfather in Germany, which is a compliation of many sources I believe, lists his occupation in 1883. The German word is Einwohner.

Upon reading the word, I immediately began probling the tubes that make up the Internet to translate it, using everything from Google Translate to a hashtag on Twitter.

Not satisfied, I tried a mailing list on genealogy, geographic-specific, hosted by Yahoo and recvieved this wonderfully descriptive answer from Piotr Mankowski, resident of Nowogard, Poland, which was Naugard, Germany until World War II.

“Einwohner was a status and meant a person who rented or leased a flat or house in the village or town. In some cases, the person had to pay for the roof over his head by, for example, working for a day for the owner, especially if residing in the farmer’s house.”

Heniz Radde, who was born in a place called Gross Tuchen, which isn’t far from where my ancestors lived, and now lives in Switzerland, wrote a concise explanation.

“Today Einwohner means inhabitant and nothing else. But in the past, the word was in use for day laborer and very small farmer as well. Sometimes it was written Einlieger for the same.”

ajh

Fantastic! Discovering details on my great-great grandmother.

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I wasn’t sure I’d ever find more information than what had been collected before me.

I began asking questions and taking notes on the family history in 1989, my first year of high school.

But the only info my mother had on her father’s grandparents were their names, and one was misspelled.

My maternal grandmother had them recorded as Carl Fromke and Caroline Rabe. Later, I learned that Rabe was incorrect. Her maiden name was Radde.

And now I know when she was born and when she died.

ajh

Name: Caroline Fromke
Maiden Name: Radde
Death Age: 49
Event Type: Sterbefall (Death)
Birth Date: 22 Januar 1830
[abt 1830]
Death Date: 27 Jul 1879
Death Place: Borntuchen, Preußen (Germany)
[Polen (Poland)]
Civil Registration Office: Borntuchen, Krs Bütow
Father: Michael Radde
Mother: Eva Radde
Certificate Number: 22

Albrecht Alt? Never heard of him. He was a German Lutheran scholar of the Old Testament.

Albrecht was born on September 20, 1883, so he was roughly the generation of my grandfather or great grandfather, whose name was also Albert.

As a German Lutheran scholar of the Old Testament, Albrecht authored a book, Biblia Hebraica, with a fella named R. Kittel which “became the standard critical text of the Old Testament for Bible students.”

ajh

I’ve been wondering about the name August, the Germanic form of Augustus. It is prominent among my maternal grandfather’s family.

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Augustus II the Strong (German: August II. der Starke) | His great physical strength earned him the nicknames the Strong, the Saxon Hercules and Iron-Hand.

My great grandfather was Albert August Fromke. His younger brother was August L. Fromke. Albert’s wife was Augusta Wilhelmina Lentz.

I am hoping to learn about why this was such a strong tradition in Germany. There is many a German prince with the name and a few princesses too.

There’s Augustus the Strong, born in Dresden and elected King of Poland. There’s Augustus the Third, son of Augustus the Strong who also became King of Poland.

Then, there’s Augustus the Younger. He had the largest collection of books and manuscripts north of the Alps. There is Augustus d’Este, a grandson of King George III of Great Britain.

It all goes back to Augustus, Elector of Saxony. And, of course, before him, there was Rome. The first Roman emperor is known as Augustus.

ajh

Thank God for America & our freedoms. There’s no freedom of association in Germany. No BBQs for rebel, neo-Nazi scum.

No BBQs for you, neo-Nazi scum!

A few nuts wanna have a BBQ? Nope. Not gonna happen. About fifty hard-right crazies wanted to share bratwurst and beer while talking fashion tips, but the authorities grew suspicious and shut it down.

Jack-booted thug wannabes can’t assemble in Germany. Hitler’s beer hall get-togethers still hang over Deutschland like the smog in Los Angeles.

You’d think authorities would want these hangouts in public, where folks can keep an eye on ’em. I want any Nazi freaks well-known to the community. And having a picnic is better than having them march through the streets harassing people or rioting.

Maybe venting at a shindig will be cathartic and lessen any impulses to commit violence. If hard-right thugs are gonna plan something, they’ll find a way to do it.

Freedom is much too important to let a distinct minority of radicals disrupt it. Time for a reassessment, Germany.

ajh

Why?

GER_RP
This was on the front page of the Rheinische Post, a newspaper in Düsseldorf, Germany

I hate seeing beautiful buildings, often historic, being torn down, particularly churches. I just don’t understand how developers can do such things nor how communities just stand by and let it. It happened to the church my grandparents helped build and where my parents married. It’s disgraceful.

ajh