Tag Archives: History

Einwohner? Notes on German society in 1883, using my great grandpa as a case study.

GERMAN, A CHANGING LANGUAGE

Hmm. The only record that I’ve found of my great grandfather in Germany, which is a compliation of many sources I believe, lists his occupation in 1883. The German word is Einwohner.

Upon reading the word, I immediately began probling the tubes that make up the Internet to translate it, using everything from Google Translate to a hashtag on Twitter.

Not satisfied, I tried a mailing list on genealogy, geographic-specific, hosted by Yahoo and recvieved this wonderfully descriptive answer from Piotr Mankowski, resident of Nowogard, Poland, which was Naugard, Germany until World War II.

“Einwohner was a status and meant a person who rented or leased a flat or house in the village or town. In some cases, the person had to pay for the roof over his head by, for example, working for a day for the owner, especially if residing in the farmer’s house.”

Heniz Radde, who was born in a place called Gross Tuchen, which isn’t far from where my ancestors lived, and now lives in Switzerland, wrote a concise explanation.

“Today Einwohner means inhabitant and nothing else. But in the past, the word was in use for day laborer and very small farmer as well. Sometimes it was written Einlieger for the same.”

ajh

Advertisements

Bluetooth technology is named after Harald Bluetooth, whose initials in runic script — ᚼᛒ — make up the logo.

FIRST KING OF THE DANES

The Bluetooth name is an Anglicized version of the Scandinavian word Blåtand, sometimes spelled Blåtann. In Old Norse it’s Blátǫnn. The word is the epithet of the tenth-century king Harald Bluetooth who united dissonant Danish tribes into a single kingdom and, according to legend, introduced Christianity. The Bluetooth logo is a combination of Harald’s initials, using what are called the Hagall (ᚼ) and Bjarkan (ᛒ) characters.

ajh

Manhattan, 1887

DH9sXbyUMAAGrLa

When my great grandparents landed at the Castle Garden immigration depot at the tip of Manhattan in 1887, this is what New York City looked like, at least on one street. It must have been exciting, traveling from the far reaches of Germany in Eastern Europe, likely visiting the cities of Stettin, Berlin and Bremen along the way, and ending up in New York City after crossing the Atlantic before setting out for their final destination, South Dakota.

ajh

Goodbye, Cousin

300px-Doty-42-4THERE ARE LOTS
of us, no doubt. Cousins, that is. As you go back in time, the fewer the people and therefore the increased likelihood that any two people today share a common ancestor.

Such is the case with a roguish character who sailed for America on the Mayflower as an indentured servant, Edward Doty. I am a descendant, thanks to my mother.

So was Dorothy Anne “D.A.” Murphy Van Nest of Scottsdale, Arizona. She died in September at the age of 95, and I learned about her connection to Doty and me from her obituary.

ajh

Hugh Hefner was a descendant of Puritan leader William Bradford.

Hugh Hefner, founder of Playboy magazine and an ensuing media empire, recently died at the age of 91. And feminist icon Camille Paglia had a few thoughts.

“Hefner’s new vision of American masculinity was part of his desperate revision of his own Puritan heritage. On his father’s side, he descended directly from William Bradford, who came over on the Mayflower and was governor of Plymouth Colony, the major settlement of New England Puritans.”

An interesting take on Hefner and the sexual revolution.

ajh