Tag Archives: Words

Words that are a foot-and-a-half long?

While reading a bit of commentary from north of the border, I came across a word, a big word unknown to me, sesquipedalian.

So I had to look it up, and Douglas Harper and his Online Etymology Dictionary don’t disappoint.

1610s, “person or thing a foot and a half long,” from Latin sesquipedalia “a foot-and-a-half long,” from sesqui- “half as much again” (see sesqui-) + stem of pes “foot” (from PIE root *ped- “foot”). As an adjective 1650s. Meaning “sesquipedalian word” (1830) is from Latin sesquipedalia verba “words a foot-and-a-half long,” in Horace’s “Ars Poetica” (97), nicely illustrating the thing he is criticizing.

Words that are a foot-and-a-half long? That certainly describes Conrad Black. But I do like him and his writing. His insights are a good perspective of whatever he’s commenting about.

Black’s trial and imprisonment is a case of the power of vindictive bureaucrats using the State to pursue their perverted senses of justice. Far too many people, from Martha Stewart to thousands of black men, have been wrongly caught up in the corrupt, highly profitable justice system.

There’s a lot of money in prisons. And we must demand reform! It’s time to reduce the prison population.

ajh

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I’d like to see the methodology. I find it dubious. Call me skeptical.

curious_too

The results may not be scientific, but they sure were amusing.”

My favorites are West Virginia and Connecticut. Kudos to those keeping “Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious!” alive. I actually sang the song from Mary Poppins on stage during high school. It was so much fun! A duet with Bethany Wiggins, a crazy Mormon girl.

ajh

The Origins of Easter

Besides the Jesus Part, Of Course

Some sources claim the word Easter is derived from Ēostre, a Teutonic goddess of spring and fertility. Other accounts trace Easter to the Latin term hebdomada alba, or white week, an ancient reference to Easter week and the white clothing donned by people who were baptized during that time. Through a translation error, the term later appeared as esostarum in Old High German, which eventually became Easter in English.”

ajh

Eskimo, Eskimo, Eskimo, Eskimo, Eskimo, Eskimo!

Obama signs into law ban of word Eskimo and othersPresident Obama has signed into law a measure that abolishes the terms Negro, American Indian, Eskimo, Oriental, Indians, Aleut and “Spanish speaking individual of Spanish descent” from use.

When will we ban the word government? How about bureaucrat and its variations?

I plan on using the word Eskimo as much as possible now. Let’s rename the Washington Redskins, the DC Eskimos!

When does the madness end? Sadly, it never does and never will.

ajh